Andy’s round-up: Reddit and Snapchat team up, Twitter hones its controversial policy

Kirsty

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Each week our Growth Director Andy Lambert puts together a brief overview of social media news for the past week. So what happened last week? 👀

🤔 What happened?

Mark Zuckerberg defends Facebook’s decision not to censor misleading political ads

💡 My take

Facebook’s recent policy, which allows political leaders to run ads with content that isn’t true, has come under fire recently. Zuckerberg defends this as tech’s non-interference with politics, but if this were completely true, why run political ads at all?

 

🤔 What happened?

Facebook has begun to diminish organic page impressions

💡 My take

This isn’t great news, but it makes sense for Facebook. When organic impressions go down, the ‘Boost Post’ button seems so much more appealing. With the ceiling for possible engagement lower, page owners will need a hybrid social strategy that, yes, probably includes a little spend.

 

🤔 What happened?

Snapchat lowers bar to entry posting ads with dynamic ad products for direct response advertisers

💡 My take

Advertisers considering Snapchat for ads have a more appealing reason to use the platform. That’s because advertisers can connect their ads straight to their product catalogue, which makes it quick to spin up ads. Lower barrier to entry means that more advertisers dip their toes into using Snapchat for ads. Now they need to ensure advertisers see return on spend, so stick around.

 

🤔 What happened?

Twitter reigns in engagement on Tweets from world leaders that break its terms

💡 My take

Twitter seems to be dancing on this one. Both Facebook and Twitter have been struggling to communicate the upside to their world-leaders are above the law policies they’ve introduced recently. This detail seems to be a concession on Twitter’s part, but allowing only quote-posting actually helps break apart the virality of these posts, while keeping the debate alive.

 

🤔 What happened

Snapchat users can now share their favourite Reddit posts as stickers

💡 My take

Reddit can be brilliant. Content is buzzy, witty and laser-focused like no other social platform. The only problem is, non-Reddit users often won’t realise that content exists. When it does end up on another social site, the content often isn’t attributed to the original poster, and Reddit won’t the credit as the source. I see this feature as Reddit opening its doors to other platforms.

 

Andy does a round-up of social media news every week. Connect with Andy on Linkedin to get it first.

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